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An Introduction to The PLEAD (The Plant Earth Database) PDF Print E-mail
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Saturday, 21 July 2012 16:27

The Plant Earth Database is a uniquely useful presentation of the plants of the planet Earth, aiming to be all inclusive for plants and easily spotted fungi and lichens. Designed to be used by average people to catalog, identify, and plan plantings of non-self-mobile life across the planet. The Plant Earth Database (also known as the Pl.Ea.D - pronounce "plead") is designed to encourage a diverse array of plantings in home, business and municipal landscapes. PlEaD is partnered with and works in synergy with the Species Saver program.

The PlEaD provides plants known by their common names and scientific names presented with information which makes selecting plants for planting easy as well as more likely to succeed. Simply input the parameters of the area in which you would like to plant and select your favorites from the list of fitting species. Results can be filtered by fit, edibility, drought tolerance, and other functional uses.

It allows for the presentation of plants according to their sizes & setting requirements such as such as sunlight, region, watering levels, companion plants, and much more. The key is not just in the databse information, but in the content and function of the data's presentation. We suspect that the Plant Earth Database may become the single most useful source of information assisting professional gardeners, landscapers, and at home growers on the planet. With the PlEaD we hope to be instrumental in replanting a stronger ecosystem of natural and regionaly appropriate biodiversity. Our PlEaD to you is that you help us get it funded by contributing financially or by spreading the word about the importance of the project and how beautiful our world will be as it becomes thoroughly planted with useful, diverse, and self-sustaining species. Help nature fill in the ugly monotonous urban plantings of the past. Support the PlEaD.

Last Updated on Sunday, 21 July 2013 17:29